Visual Arts T/A/M

  • Visual Art (T A,M)
  • Photography (T,A,M)
  • Ceramics  (T,A,M)
  • Media (T,A,M)

The Visual Arts provide opportunities for students to learn to solve problems, think creatively and develop mental disciplines which are valuable and highly transferable skills for any academic endeavour. Study of the Visual Arts at the Accredited (A) and Tertiary (T) levels can help to establish career pathways in the Arts, Media and Design industries. The Department of Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs website has an excellent resource regarding careers.

A variety of assessment tasks, including written and practical, will be used in all units.

Visual Art (T, A, M)

This course is suitable for students who have developed an interest in this area in high school and are looking for avenues to further their practical skills and ability to express themselves through visual and written language. At the ‘T’ level it is also suitable for students who are contemplating further study in areas such as Visual Arts, Graphic or Industrial Design, Architecture, Arts education, etc.  There is no prior learning required to study Visual Art.

The major course is comprised of four standard 1.0 units, which will be selected in consultation with the classroom teacher according to available resources, student needs and interests. The units include teacher-directed work and student initiated major works.

Typical assessment items will consist of:

  • a Visual Arts Process Diary that includes a folio of practical exercises related to specific materials, techniques and approaches in each unit. Students will also use their VAPD to demonstrate an investigation of key artists and their work and develop, plan and reflect on their own artmaking process
  • a major work that is based on a developed concept
  • a written assignment which may take the forms of an essay or research task

The units below are designed for teaching at both ‘T’ and ‘A’ levels. Students studying at ‘T’ level cover the same content, but in greater detail. It is also expected they will develop their skills more than students studying at ‘A’ level and this will be reflected in the assessment for individual units. A combination of the following units will be offered as a major in Visual Art:

Drawing

This unit provides basic skills in using a variety of drawing media, with an exploration of both traditional and contemporary approaches. Experimentation and self-expression are a strong focus of this course as students consider ‘how’ and ‘why’ artists make drawings. The study of aspects of the art-making process, techniques, terms and concepts related to various media are important components of this unit.

Painting

This unit explores a variety of painting techniques, concepts and artists from a variety of cultures and art movements, from both historical and contemporary contexts. An understanding of several painting mediums; acrylic, watercolour, gouache and oils, is developed through experimentation. Students then demonstrate their newly-acquired abilities through the development of a conceptual major work, in a medium of their choice.

Printmaking

Students explore a range of printmaking techniques and processes in this unit; relief, etching/intaglio, screen printing, collograph and mono-printing.  Students investigate the historical tradition of these methods, as well as contemporary approaches developed by modern printmakers from a variety of cultures. This unit offers a very different approach to artmaking as it presents new and unique concepts and avenues for experimentation and self-expression.

Sculpture

The focus of this unit is on the development of technical and conceptual skills related to sculpture and installation practice. Specifically, students experiment with the sculptural processes associated with subtraction, substitution, addition, and manipulation, using a wide variety of media. This is a very ‘hands on’ unit that allows students to move away from the 2D surface and explore the exciting and often challenging world of 3D Art.

Culture and Identity

This unit provides students an opportunity to investigate many rich and meaningful themes associated with their own, as well as others, culture and identity. Students will be encouraged to think deeply as they reflect on a variety of ideas that relate to themselves as individuals, the society in which we live and the global cultures that have shaped our world. For their major work students will develop a conceptual artwork that challenges the viewer in some way, in a medium and format of their choice.

Protest Art

In the Protest Art unit students examine a variety of ways artists use their work to make social comment. They will investigate ideas such as the relationship between art and politics, the importance of the artist’s ‘voice’ in the world, related ethical issues, propaganda, the Media and the power of artistic appropriation. Students have an exciting opportunity to create work of a challenging or subversive nature as they present their own perspectives in a public arena.

Photography (T, A, M)

This course is suitable for students who have developed an interest in the Visual Arts and/or Photography in high school or who may be contemplating tertiary studies or a career in this field.  A minor or major in Photography is a useful addition to a portfolio for entrance into Photography, design or art courses at tertiary institutions.  There are no prerequisites for the study of Photography in Semester 1 year 11. The Photography Practice unit is a prerequisite for Semester 2 Year 11.

Both Accredited (A) and Tertiary (T) courses consist of four 1.0 standard units.  These courses assume no prior photographic experience. Students learn SLR camera operations and explore the possibilities associated with the use of the elements and principles of design. They are also introduced to appropriate file storage and management procedures and experiment widely with digital media manipulation. Many skills associated with producing a body of digital work are developed.

Approaches to the use of different compositional devices, the application of natural and studio lighting and the incorporation of a range of lenses and filters is a focus. Students also develop an ability to manipulate their images further, practising many Photoshop techniques for specific effect. The history of photography, its pioneers and masters are studied as well as the development of photography into a modern art form.  Both teacher and student directed activities form a part of each unit.

Typical assessment items will consist of:

  • a Visual Arts Process Diary that may include examples of technical exercises and demonstrates an investigation of specific photographers and their work, techniques and approaches.
  • a major work or series of student-directed works
  • a written assignment which may take the forms of an exhibition report, essay, research task, etc.

The units below are designed for learning at both ‘T’ and ‘A’ levels.  Students studying at ‘T’ level cover the same content, but in greater detail.  It is also expected they will develop their skills more than students studying at ‘A’ level and this will be reflected in the assessment for individual units.

Students must begin their study at the first unit and study units sequentially.

Photography Practice – Prerequisite – Nil

This is a foundation unit and a prerequisite for all subsequent units.  It provides basic practical and theoretical knowledge on using cameras, manipulating digital media and printing photographs.  Composition, movement and light are the areas through which students explore and express their ideas.

Photography Communication – Prerequisite – Photography Practice

This unit builds upon skills acquired in the foundation unit with an emphasis on consolidating and expanding previous understanding of digital procedures and an experimental approach to printing.  A study of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century photographers is included to enhance awareness of composition and photographic techniques.

Photography Applications – Prerequisite – Photography Practice, Photography Communication

A study of the many varied vocational applications of photography is investigated along with natural and artificial lighting, lenses, camera filters and creative presentation methods. Students examine a variety of photographic genres, included fashion photography, landscape photography, photojournalism and studio portraiture.

Art Photography – Prerequisite – Photography Practice, Photography Communication

This unit focuses on alternative photographic processes and explores photography as a means of creative self-expression.  The history of photography as Art is investigated and several key art photographers are examined.  Students prepare portfolios of their work, based on a negotiated concept.

Ceramics (T, A, M)

Ceramics is offered as an independent elective option in 2019. This course is ideal for students who identify an interest in the Ceramic construction process and would suit those who are seeking avenues to further their practical and concept development skills. The Ceramics course encourages students to explore their creativity and develop an individualised approach in their work. At the ‘T’ level it is also appropriate for students who are contemplating a career in such areas as Visual Arts, Graphic or Industrial Design, Arts education, etc.  There is no prior learning required to study Ceramics.

The course is comprised of four standard 1.0 units, which will be selected in consultation with the classroom teacher according to available resources, student needs and interests. The units include teacher-directed work and student initiated major works.

Typical assessment items will consist of:

  • a Visual Arts Process Diary that includes a folio of practical exercises and demonstrates an investigation of specific Ceramic artists and their work techniques, materials and approaches
  • a major work or series of student-directed works
  • an assignment which may take the forms of an exhibition report, essay, research task etc.

The units below are designed for teaching at both ‘T’ and ‘A’ levels. Students studying at ‘T’ level cover the same content, but in greater detail. It is also expected they will develop their skills more than students studying at ‘A’ level and this will be reflected in the assessment for individual units.

Exploring Ceramics  – Prerequisite – Nil

This is a foundation unit and forms an essential foundation for all later Ceramics courses. In Exploring Ceramics students develop concepts related to form and texture as they investigate of a variety of clay construction techniques. Emphasis will also be placed on surface treatment and decoration as a means for personal expression and creativity.

Hollow Ceramic Form Sculpture –  Prerequisite – Exploring Ceramics

This unit builds upon skills acquired in Exploring Ceramics.  An emphasis is placed on consolidating and expanding students’ previous understanding of techniques associated with the creation of hollow sculptures. This course provides students an excellent opportunity to explore their construction and decoration approach and investigate specific areas of interest in more depth.

Ceramic Decoration and Firing –  Prerequisite – Exploring Ceramics

Using clay as the medium to create artworks, students learn additional techniques of finishing and firing. They look at historical, cultural and technological aspects of decoration and firing from a cross-cultural perspective. The emphasis of this course will be on experimentation with surface decoration and how this informs and affects their finished pieces

Ceramic Sculpture and Mixed Media – Prerequisite – Exploring Ceramics

In this course students use their repertoire of skills to create a mixed media major work within a ceramic context. Students’ ability to develop a thematic approach in their work is further developed. Students are encouraged to experiment with a wide variety of art media in order to present engaging and innovative sculptural responses.

Media (T, A, M)

Media is a unique art form that influences our perception and understanding of the world. The study of media enables learners to engage with innovative thinkers and practitioners and to experience media as producers and audience members.

In the making of media products, students learn about:

  • media codes and conventions
  • representation
  • workflow end-to-end production
  • technology
  • production process
  • how to engage an audience

Students will develop an informed critical appreciation of media products, considering media practices, elements, genres, styles, production, techniques and conventions in the construction of meaning. The study of media equips students with communication skills while also providing continuity with many tertiary and industry courses.

The course is comprised of four standard 1.0 units, which will be selected in consultation with the classroom teacher according to available resources, student needs and interests. The units include teacher-directed work and student initiated major works.

Typical assessment items will consist of:

  • Vlog that includes videos of practical exercises and demonstrates, investigation of specific techniques, technology and reflect on approaches that influence their class or major works.
  • A major work or series of student-directed works
  • A written task which may take the forms of a report, essay, research task etc.

The units below are designed for teaching at both ‘T’ and ‘A’ levels. Students studying at ‘T’ level cover the same content, but in greater detail. It is also expected they will develop their skills more than students studying at ‘A’ level and this will be reflected in the assessment for individual units.

Media Fundamentals

Prerequisites: Nil

This unit introduces technical, symbolic and narrative elements, as well as production and media issues. This also investigates the codes and conventions applicable to the study of communication theory. It is designed as a generalist unit – in which the basic codes and conventions of media communication and production are identified and developed.  Students will evaluate their creative process through pre-production, production, post-production and distribution.

Film Genre

Prerequisites: Nil

The focus of this unit is to explore a modern method of film studies that assesses the role of the audience, the industry and the artist in creating influential genres of film production. Students will explore a wide range of cultural and historical transformations of popular genres such as science fiction, crime and action. Students will create their own media product and evaluate and reflect on the production process through pre-production, production and post-production.

Popular Cultural
Prerequisites: Nil

The focus of this unit is to examine the concept of culture, ideology, systems of representation and the role of media in a cultural context. Students will undertake a study of popular culture, its links with media organisations and the nature of specific popular culture sectors such as the music industry, cyber culture, augmented reality, emerging technologies and mass marketing.  It focuses on theory (communication, history, issues) and skill development for the creation of media products in a variety of mediums and a range of genres and target audiences.

Documentary
Prerequisites: Nil

This unit explores the social, cultural and aesthetic impact of the documentary genre through a study of documentaries. Fictional forms of the documentary genre (mockumentary) may be included along with a variety of documentaries, short documentaries, mockumentaries, and selected examples of reality television. Students will create their own media product and evaluate and reflect on the production process through pre-production, production and post-production.